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Figuring the Unknown

Figuring the Unknown

MRB September 14, 2017 0

A review of Judith H. Anderson’s Light and Death: Figuration in Spenser, Kepler, Donne, Milton. In 1959, a British novelist and chemist named Charles Percy Snow delivered a memorable lecture at the University of

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When Literature was Science

When Literature was Science

MRB September 7, 2017 0

Clio Doyle reviews Claire Preston’s The Poetics of Scientific Investigation in Seventeenth-Century England  Science was everywhere in the seventeenth century, especially in literature. For example, it was in this century that Margaret Cavendish wrote

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MRBlog | Sticking to Your Convictions: The Brain and Belief

Sarah Rollens December 30, 2016 0

    By Sarah E. Rollens Most of us like to think that our worldviews result from our own careful navigation through life’s varied experiences. We assess situations, relationship, interactions, and the like to

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Science vs. Religion and Other Modern Myths – by Samuel Loncar

Science vs. Religion and Other Modern Myths – by Samuel Loncar

Samuel Loncar October 7, 2016 0

On Peter Harrison’s The Territories of Science and Religion, and Jerry Coyne’s Faith versus Fact: Why Science and Religion are Incompatible. If god is dead, myth is not. Myths are the stories that tell

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The Modern Mosaic of Science and Religion – by Donovan Schaefer

The Modern Mosaic of Science and Religion – by Donovan Schaefer

Donovan Schaefer September 10, 2016 0

Donovan Schaefer on Peter Harrison’s The Territories of Science and Religion Are science and religion doomed to clash? Are they irreconcilable — a mutually antagonistic set of beliefs and approaches to the world? Or

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First Impressions #90: Erik Hammerstrom on the Science of Chinese Buddhism

First Impressions #90: Erik Hammerstrom on the Science of Chinese Buddhism

Kristian Petersen September 6, 2016 0

Chinese Buddhists saw modern science as an effective means for the investigation of knowledge but critiqued its underlying social ethic. Kristian Petersen talks with Erik Hammerstrom, Associate Professor of East Asian and Comparative Religions

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First Impressions #89: Religion, Science, and Conflict in American Public Life

First Impressions #89: Religion, Science, and Conflict in American Public Life

David M. Krueger August 22, 2016 0

Why do religion and science often appear in conflict in America’s public sphere? The more fundamental divide is between how media elites and ordinary Americans understand what constitutes good debate. Dave Krueger interviews Michael S. Evans about

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How to Be Human in a Machine World – by Samuel Loncar

How to Be Human in a Machine World – by Samuel Loncar

Samuel Loncar December 8, 2015 0

The future of humans in a world dominated by computers Humans seem to relish the prospect of their own extinction. Perhaps it’s the imaginative equivalent to standing on the edge of a cliff overlooking

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Theology and the University: A Lover’s Quarrel – Jonathan D. Teubner

Theology and the University: A Lover’s Quarrel – Jonathan D. Teubner

Jonathan D. Teubner May 26, 2015 0

Jonathan D. Teubner on Johannes Zachhuber’s Theology as Science in Nineteenth-Century Germany “A professorship of theology should have no place in our institution,” Thomas Jefferson declared in a letter written to philosopher Thomas Cooper

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Belief Is Not Dead: Science, Theology, and Culture in Graham Ward’s <i>Unbelievable</i> – By Sarah Lane

Belief Is Not Dead: Science, Theology, and Culture in Graham Ward’s Unbelievable – By Sarah Lane

Sarah Lane April 28, 2015 0

Sarah Lane on Graham Ward’s Unbelievable The topic of belief can seem an awkward guest in contemporary discussions of epistemology. Tacitly or openly assumed to equate with opinion, hope, or fancy, belief is often

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