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Does Jewish Logic Necessarily Lead to Israel?

Does Jewish Logic Necessarily Lead to Israel?

Alex Adam November 24, 2017 0

Jacob Abolafia on the existential and political character of 20th-century American Jewish life O you youths, western youths, So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship, Plain I see you, western

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Reading the Bible with Authority

Reading the Bible with Authority

Alex Adam October 27, 2017 0

Bruce Gordon on the problem of who says? Perhaps the most well-known aspect of the Reformation was how it made the Bible available in the languages of lay people, an achievement iconically represented by Luther’s

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Edom Divided: Jews and the Reformation

Edom Divided: Jews and the Reformation

Alex Adam October 27, 2017 0

Lars Fischer on Jewish views of the Reformation and Christian anti-Judaism “The Reformation” is really an umbrella term that covers a whole range of partly distinct, partly overlapping reformations that emerged and unfolded (even

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The Protestant Reformation as a Metaphysical Revolution

The Protestant Reformation as a Metaphysical Revolution

Alex Adam October 26, 2017 0

Samuel Loncar on the intellectual revolution of the modern age The Protestant Reformation, like any historical event, is a construction of memory. Memory, in turn, shapes identity. We are what we remember, but more

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The Trial of the Talmud

The Trial of the Talmud

MRB September 28, 2017 0

Anti-Judaism and the Talmud in Medieval French Society The thirteenth century was a tumultuous time for the Jews of France. New regulations limited Jews’ ability to charge interest on loans and take pledges. Jewish

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First Impressions #99: Aaron Hughes on the American Jewish Iconoclast, Jacob Neusner

First Impressions #99: Aaron Hughes on the American Jewish Iconoclast, Jacob Neusner

Kristian Petersen December 19, 2016 0

Because of Jacob Neusner, the scholarly study of Judaism flourishes in secular universities, not just rabbinical schools. Kristian Petersen talks with Aaron W. Hughes, Professor of Jewish Studies in the Department of Religion and

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First Impressions # 95: Eva Mroczek on the Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity

First Impressions # 95: Eva Mroczek on the Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity

Joseph Ryan Kelly October 25, 2016 0

There was no such thing as the Bible when ancient Jewish literature was composed. With a more expansive view of sources, we can glimpse our way into a completely different picture of how ancient

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First Impressions # 92: Christine Hayes on the Nature of Divine Law

First Impressions # 92: Christine Hayes on the Nature of Divine Law

Joseph Ryan Kelly October 4, 2016 0

Greco-Roman conceptions of divine and human law forced Judaism to examine and debate the divine identity of Mosaic law. In this special extended edition of First Impressions, Joseph Ryan Kelly talks with Christine Hayes,

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Feeling Sorry the Wrong Way – by Anthony Bash

Feeling Sorry the Wrong Way – by Anthony Bash

Anthony Bash August 29, 2016 0

Anthony Bash on David Lambert’s How Repentance Became Biblical In some ways, regret, repentance, and remorse are popular emotions in the modern world. Public apologies for personal wrongdoing or for national, corporate, or institutional

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Problems of Poverty and the Recently Impoverished – By John Mandsager

Problems of Poverty and the Recently Impoverished – By John Mandsager

John Mandsager August 16, 2016 0

John Mandsager on Gregg Gardner’s The Origins of Organized Charity in Rabbinic Judaism According to Suetonius (Lives of the Twelve Caesars, II.91), once a year, the Emperor Augustus would don beggars’ garb and spend

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