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Does Jewish Logic Necessarily Lead to Israel?

Does Jewish Logic Necessarily Lead to Israel?

Alex Adam November 24, 2017 0

Jacob Abolafia on the existential and political character of 20th-century American Jewish life O you youths, western youths, So impatient, full of action, full of manly pride and friendship, Plain I see you, western

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Jews and Muslims in France: Rethinking a History of Conflict, Colonialism, and Coexistence – by Rachel Eva Schley

Jews and Muslims in France: Rethinking a History of Conflict, Colonialism, and Coexistence – by Rachel Eva Schley

Rachel Schley September 10, 2016 0

Rachel Schley on Ethan B. Katz’s The Burdens of Brotherhood For well over a decade there has been an active debate about the increasingly vexed state of Jewish-Muslim relations in France. Since 2000, with

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The Importance of Premillennialism – By Dan Hummel

The Importance of Premillennialism – By Dan Hummel

Dan Hummel October 27, 2015 0

Dan Hummel on Matthew Sutton’s American Apocalypse In 1970, an ex-tugboat captain and self-described prophecy expert named Hal Lindsey published The Late Great Planet Earth. It would go on to become the decade’s highest

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Possible Moralities in Impossible Times – By Saskia Coenen Snyder

Possible Moralities in Impossible Times – By Saskia Coenen Snyder

Saskia Coenen Snyder September 1, 2015 2

Saskia Coenen Snyder on Bernard Wasserstein’s The Ambiguity of Virtue The behavior of the Jewish Councils, the administrative bodies appointed by the Germans to govern Jewish communities and execute Nazi directives throughout Nazi-occupied Europe,

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The Logic of God: A New Look at an Old Reason to Believe – By Joshua Rasmussen

The Logic of God: A New Look at an Old Reason to Believe – By Joshua Rasmussen

Joshua Rasmussen April 14, 2015 0

Joshua Rasmussen on A.D. Smith’s Anselm’s Other Argument Can belief in God be based upon reason? Anselm of Canterbury (c. 1033-1109) thought so. Anselm was a Benedictine monk and theologian who became Archbishop of

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A Deep Earthquake: Late Antique Sexuality and the Rise of Christianity – By Susanna Drake

A Deep Earthquake: Late Antique Sexuality and the Rise of Christianity – By Susanna Drake

Susanna Drake January 20, 2015 0

Susanna Drake on Kyle Harper’s From Shame to Sin Anyone who has ever visited an exhibit of ancient Greek or Roman art is familiar with the ubiquity of erotic imagery in ancient visual culture. Sexual

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Imagining Life Beyond Capital – By Joerg Rieger

Imagining Life Beyond Capital – By Joerg Rieger

Joerg Rieger September 2, 2014 0

Joerg Rieger on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century There may be no more important topic to discuss at present than that of capital. It might not be surprising to hear such a

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A Unified Reading of Maimonides’ <i>Guide</i> – By Dani Rabinowitz

A Unified Reading of Maimonides’ Guide – By Dani Rabinowitz

Dani Rabinowitz June 10, 2014 0

Dani Rabinowitz on Josef Stern’s The Matter and Form of Maimonides’ Guide Moses Maimonides (1135 – 1204), born in Córdoba during the twilight years of Spanish Jewry’s golden era, was a medieval polymath who,

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Anti-Semitism and the Evolving Catholic Conscience

Anti-Semitism and the Evolving Catholic Conscience

Martin Menke December 4, 2013 0

Martin Menke on John Connelly’s From Enemy to Brother: The Revolution in Catholic Teaching on the Jews New histories of the Shoah provoke a range of responses: continued outrage and incredulity regarding the horrors

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To Whom is the Qur’an Addressed? – By Whitney S. Bodman

To Whom is the Qur’an Addressed? – By Whitney S. Bodman

Whitney S. Bodman August 15, 2013 1

Whitney S. Bodman responds to Rachel Friedman I appreciate the effort involved in Rachel Friedman’s review of my new book, but I would like to elaborate on reader-response theory as a justifiable method in

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