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How Christianity Killed the Pagan Gods

How Christianity Killed the Pagan Gods

MRB September 1, 2017 0

A review of Larry Hurtado’s Why on Earth Did Anyone Become a Christian in the First Three Centuries? and Destroyer of the gods: Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World Historical facts and obscure

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Biblical Bridal Songs and Latin Reception – by E. Ann Matter

Biblical Bridal Songs and Latin Reception – by E. Ann Matter

E. Ann Matter December 26, 2016 0

E. Ann Matter on Karl Shuve’s The Song of Songs Scholarly interest in the traditions of biblical exegesis of the medieval Latin tradition has flourished since the first publication of Beryl Smalley’s The Study

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Feeling Sorry the Wrong Way – by Anthony Bash

Feeling Sorry the Wrong Way – by Anthony Bash

Anthony Bash August 29, 2016 0

Anthony Bash on David Lambert’s How Repentance Became Biblical In some ways, regret, repentance, and remorse are popular emotions in the modern world. Public apologies for personal wrongdoing or for national, corporate, or institutional

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The Summit of Spiritual Perfection in the Messiness of Worldly Affairs – By John Moorhead

The Summit of Spiritual Perfection in the Messiness of Worldly Affairs – By John Moorhead

John Moorhead May 9, 2016 0

John Moorhead on George Demacopoulos’s Gregory the Great Pope Gregory the Great was one of those people who found himself pulled in very different directions. The first monk to become a pope, he was

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What Has Practice to Do with Theology? – By Bradley Peper

What Has Practice to Do with Theology? – By Bradley Peper

Bradley M. Peper April 11, 2016 0

Bradley Peper on J. Patout Burns Jr. and Robin M. Jensen’s Christianity in Roman Africa Traditionally, studies in early Christianity have emphasized one area of inquiry over another, inevitably fostering an intellectual partitioning of

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God’s Recovery – By Gregory W. Lee

God’s Recovery – By Gregory W. Lee

Gregory W. Lee October 27, 2015 0

Gregory W. Lee on Khaled Anatolios’ Retrieving Nicaea Debates regarding the doctrine of the Trinity are often presented as a classic example of the divorce between the academic study of theology and the concrete

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In the Footsteps of Shenoute – Caroline T. Schroeder

In the Footsteps of Shenoute – Caroline T. Schroeder

Caroline T. Schroeder October 13, 2015 0

Caroline T. Schroeder on Bentley Layton’s The Canons of Our Fathers Every year in the month of July over ten thousand pilgrims flock to the White Monastery outside of the city of Sohag, Egypt,

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Spectres of the Real Paul and the Prospect of Pauline Scholarship – By T.J. Lang

Spectres of the Real Paul and the Prospect of Pauline Scholarship – By T.J. Lang

T.J. Lang May 26, 2015 0

T.J. Lang on Benjamin L. White’s Remembering Paul The fashionable dictum among historians today is that biographies do not repristinate their subjects “as they really were,” in the quaint Rankean sense. Biography is instead

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Thomas Merton and the Benefit of Recollecting Ancient Christian Worship – By Lee M. Jefferson

Thomas Merton and the Benefit of Recollecting Ancient Christian Worship – By Lee M. Jefferson

Lee M. Jefferson April 14, 2015 0

Lee M. Jefferson on Andrew B. McGowan’s Ancient Christian Worship: Early Church Practices in Social, Historical, and Theological Perspective A Sufi scholar once wrote to the Trappist monk Thomas Merton at his monastery nestled

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Metaphor and Its Limits – By Ellen Muehlberger

Metaphor and Its Limits – By Ellen Muehlberger

Ellen Muehlberger March 31, 2015 0

Ellen Muehlberger on Douglas Boin’s Coming Out Christian in the Roman World Douglas Boin starts his new book by revealing a secret about himself: though he is an archaeologist of the early Roman empire and

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